New life in the pond

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New tadpoles in the pond , blind and with external gills.

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Frogs galore

 Today the pond was alive with the sound of music well frogs croaking and the spawn count has gone from one batch to four. I counted over 15 frogs either singles or mating pairs.  It goes to show how important a small urban pond is for the wild life from the bees drinking in it , birds bathing in it hoverflies laying their young , ok mosquitoes I could do without .

Water stop

My bees were busy collecting water to take back to the hive today, and they were making use of my pond. They use the water to dissolve the honey which has set in the comb amongst other things.

You can see its hairy eye which is one of the ID features it is the only bee to have hairy eyes.

Pond life(garden)

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Plenty of frogs and tadpoles still in the pond. Since a lady gave me some plants , irises , sort of grass, pond marigold and some floating weed the pond is so clear and life it seems far more natural.

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A hover fly larva

Tadpoles

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After about 21 days as spawn, the embryonic frog leaves its protective jelly as a tadpole, complete with organs, gills and a long tail.
  

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There is one kind of frog that is native to the UK, the common frog, which is found in most parts of the UK. The other was the pool frog which is believed to have become extinct in the 1990s and has since been reintroduced to a site in East Anglia