Misumena vatia

Misumena vatia

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Amaurobius ferox, Black Lace weaver (garden)

Amaurobius ferox, sometimes known as the black lace-weaver is a spider belonging to the family Amaurobiidae. It is distributed in Europe and North America and has been introduced into New Zealand.

The female of this species is around 16 mm in length (excluding legs). It is very dark brown to black overall. The abdomen is rounded and bears indistinct yellowish markings. The male is similar but smaller (length about 11 mm) and more slender. The eggs are laid in a white sac in a sheltered place. The female usually guards the sac until the eggs have hatched. This species has been known to bite man.[1]

Amaurobius ferox is a matriphagous spider, meaning that the young devour the mother after hatching. First she lays a second set of eggs on which the newly hatched spiders feed. Then a few days later she actively encourages her offspring to devour her

Wasp spider egg sack(Argiope bruennichi) Cavenham Heath NR

I found this egg sack today which belongs to the Wasp spider, a new comer to the UKĀ and one which hasn’t to my knowledge been recorded at Cavenham Heath NR

The Wasp Spider is a very large, colourful spider that is a recent arrival in the UK from the continent and has slowly spread over the south of England. They build large orb webs in grassland and heathland, and attach their silk egg-sacs to the grasses. The web has a wide, white zig-zag strip running down the middle, known as a ‘stabilimentum’, the function of which is unclear. Mating is a dangerous game for males; they wait at the edge of the web until the female has moulted into a mature form, then take advantage of her jaws being soft and rush in to mate. However, many males still get eaten during this time.

(spider Photo not mine)