Andrena chrysosceles (Fleam dyke)

Females have a brown-haired, rather dull thorax and a shiny, finely punctate abdomen with white hair fringes along the hind margins of tergites 2-4 and orange hairs at the tip of the abdomen. The hind tibiae and tarsi are orange.

This is one of our commonest spring mining bees, usually peaking with the blossoming of Blackthorn and Hawthorn though many spring flowers are visited. The first individuals to appear are nearly all stylopised intersexes…Steve Falk

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Nomada ferruginata (specimen) Lode

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Description
This Nomada bee has a red abdomen with yellow flashes at the sides. It has dull yellow legs with dark femora. It lacks stripes on the thorax and has a pair of bright yellow tubercles on the pronotum near to the wing bases.
Similar Species
Nomada ferruginata is similar to N. striata but it can be distinguished by the brighter yellow pronotal tubercles and lighter antennae. N. ferruginata also lacks the red marks on the mesonotum which are usually obvious on N. striata.
Habitat
Low vegetation around dry soils where its host bee nests.
When to see it
Mainly during March and April – to coincide with the breeding of its host bee Andrena praecox.
Life History
As with all Nomada bees, it is parasitic on solitary bees, usualy Andrena species. The host species of N. ferruginata is Andrena praecox. A.praecox is a rather uncommon mining bee and normally found in areas containing sufficient Willows as females are very dependent on Willow catkins for pollen in March and April.
UK Status
Rare in England but may be increasing.

Osmia Bicolor (Lode)

I have posted information on this bee before , I hadn’t seen one until the other week now I’m finding them everywhere. I was not expecting to see one here though as it is on the Fen side of Cambridge which is not the chalky grass lands they like , its more old railway embankment surrounded by miles of either rapeseed, broadbean or wheat fields. Anyway its a good sign and another record for the distribution map.

Osmia caerulescens (garden)

Description
Length 8 to 10 mm. The females have a blue metallic lustre to the abdomen giving rise to its common name, with black pollen-collecting hairs underneath. The males are bronze with pale yellow hairs and a shining slope at the front of the abdomen that distinguishes this species from other bees.
Habitat
Forest edges and clearings, flower meadows, orchards, parks and gardens.
When to see it
April to August/September.
Life History
Nests in holes, often existing cavities in dead wood and plant stems, rocks and mud walls. The female deposits her egg, adds food for the larvae, builds a small wall out of chewed leaves and creates the next chamber, where she will deposit the next egg.
UK Status
Widespread in England and Wales, but not usually occurring in great numbers, though more common in the south…. Naturespot

Andrena praecox (Fulbourne fen)

Andrena praecox

Description
Length 8 to 11 mm. This is a blackish bee with grey hairs. The female having more body hairs than the male.
Habitat
Heathland and open woodland where there is sufficient sallow to support populations of this bee.
When to see it
Early March to the end of April or early May.
Life History
Nests in colonies.
UK Status
Rather local, but often common where it does occur, throughout much of southern Britain, as far north as south Yorkshire.

Andrena scotica (lode& garden)

Andrena scotica
Description
Andrena scotica is a mining bee. These are very hairy bees and at 10 to 14 mm Andrena scotica is one of the larger species, the male being slightly smaller than the female. They are slimmer in appearance than bumblebees.
Habitat
They especially enjoy firm sandy soils with no overgrowing plants to smother the nest, for this reason they are often found near to pathways.
When to see it
Mid March to late June – peaking late April and May.
Life History
Females share a common entry during nesting. Underground however each female takes care of her own chamber. Using the same entrance without being a real structured community is called communal. Because many chambers share one exit, fresh animals meet each other in this exit while trying to get out for the first time in spring. Males try to mate immediately, so in many cases the females have been fertilised even before seeing daylight.
UK Status
One of the most common Andrena species, with most British records coming from southern, central and north-eastern England.

Andrena haemorrhoa (lode)

A mating pair of Andrena haemorrhoa .. When he just wont take no for an answer and all those legs just get in the way.

Description
Length 8 to 11 mm. The thorax is foxy brown on top; the abdomen is black, except for the rear end, which is foxy brown again. The male is much smaller than the female and its hairs are much lighter colour, tending to grey or even white.
Habitat
Around potential nesting sites such as gardens, playgrounds, sports fields, paths and the sides of roads.
When to see it
March to June.
Life History
Females are often seen nesting alone, but groups of females do occur, even though these groups are never very big.
UK Status
Widespread and common species in Britain…Naturesop