Banded General – Stratiomys potamida-Garden

One of the ‘big five’ soldierflies (4 Stratiomys species plus Odontomyia ornata). Easily distinguished from O. ornata by the long antennae. It is one of two boldy marked yellow and black Stratiomys species with pale tibiae and an extensively yellow underside to the abdomen. The other species is S. chamaeleon which has a pair of broad, wedge-shaped yellow spots on the sides of tergite 3 and and the yellow mark of the scutellum with an angular fore margin (the best field clue as the folded wings can obscure the abdominal markings).

This is our most widespread Stratiomys and certainly the most frequent inland, though is nevertheless localised and scarce in most districts. It is associated with a variety of non-brackish wetland types, especially seepage-fed marsh, the margins of waterbodies, fens, wet meadows, ditches, the wet parts of woods; also occasionally the perched pools of soft-rock cliffs or landward side of grazing marsh (which can occasionally result in the presence of three Stratiomys species at one site!). Most sites are characterised by good water-quality.

Nemotelus uliginosus (Barred Snout soldier fly) (Berneray & North Uist)

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Description
This is a cream and black patterned soldier fly, the males have more of the creamy colour on the abdomen than the females. Females of the species can be distinguished from the similar Nemotelus uliginosus female by the shape of the white bars on the frons. In uliginosis they are parallel-sided bars and in notatus they are wedge shaped
Habitat
Saltmarsh, waste ground and unimproved grassland, but usually coastal.
When to see it
June to early September, peaking in July.
UK Status
Fairly frequent and widespread in Britain but most records are coastal… NatureSpot.

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Black Colonel, Odontomyia tigrina (soldierfly)

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The family contains about 1,500 species in about 400 genera worldwide. Adults are found near larval habitats. Larvae can be found in a diverse array of situations mostly in wetlands and damp places in soil, sod, under bark, and in animal excrement and decaying organic matter.

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They are diverse in size and shape, though they commonly are partly or wholly metallic green, or somewhat wasplike mimics, marked with black and yellow or green and sometimes metallic. They are often rather inactive flies which typically rest with their wings placed one above the other over the abdomen

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Thanks for adding the details to iRecord. Odontomyia tigrina is known from the Cambridge area but this is the first time that it has ever been recorded in your particular 10km square – excellent