Nomada integra – Gog Magog downs

Another new species

Nomada integra

This is a scarce species that is associated with Andrena humilis in habitats such as heathland, acid grassland and grassy cliff-tops. It has been recorded as far north as Yorkshire.

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Nomada ferruginata – Lode- Rare

This is a rare species with scattered records as far north as the Midlands and north Norfolk. It attacks Andrena praecox and flies at the same time (usually April when the pussy-willow is in blossom).

Status (in Britain only)
Listed as Endangered (RDB1) in the British Red Data Book (Shirt 1987) and by Falk (1991). Recent data suggests this status needs revision
Habitat
Sites include open deciduous woodland, the coast (as at Dungeness, east Kent) and open sites where the host species occurs.
Flight period
Univoltine; mid April (exceptionally March) to mid May.
Nesting biology
A cleptoparasite of the mining bee Andrena praecox (Perkins 1919; Chambers 1949; Westrich 1989). It is only found with a small number of populations of this host species. Chambers (1949) also lists Andrena varians as a possible host.
Flowers visited
Lesser celandine (Ranunculus ficaria), black currant (Ribes nigrum), sallow (Salix sp.) and dandelion (Taraxacum sp.).

Nomada flavoguttata – Garden

A new bee record for the garden.

This is one of the smallest species of Nomada and is widely distributed throughout Britain. A very common bee, although, owing to its very small size, it is easily overlooked.

Distribution
Widely distributed throughout Britain, from southern England north to the Isle of Man and northern Scotland (Golspie, East Sutherland). In Ireland it occurs from Cork to Armagh and Down (Stelfox, 1927; Ronayne & O’Connor, 2003). Jersey is the only island in the Channel Islands where it has been reported, though not since 1903.
The Palaearctic range encompasses southern Fennoscandia, much of central and southern Europe east to Israel, Daghestan and Japan.
Status (in Britain only)
This species is not regarded as scarce or threatened.
Habitat
Generally distributed, occurring wherever its several host species are present.
Flight period
Depending on the flight periods of its host species, it can be either univoltine or bivoltine. It can be found from the end of March to late August.
Nesting biology
The species is a cleptoparasite of certain Andrena species in the subgenus Micrandrena. Those recorded are Andrena alfkenella Perkins, Andrena falsifica Perkins, Andrena minutula (Kirby), Andrena semilaevis Pérez and Andrena subopaca Nylander.
Flowers visited
Many different flowers are visited for nectar.

Nomada leucophthalma (Ratlinghope)

Distribution
Widely distributed and generally locally common throughout much of the British Isles. It is, however, inexplicably very scarce in Kent (G W Allen, pers. comm.) and Essex (P Harvey, pers. comm.). The range extends north to central Scotland (Renfrew, Midlothian and West Perthshire) and includes the Isle of Man. It is also widespread in Ireland. There are no records of the species from the Channel Islands. In Europe it is mainly found in the north (reaching northern Finland), with only scattered records from further south.
Status (in Britain only)
This species is not regarded as being scarce or threatened.
Habitat
Found with the host bee in open woodland, on heaths and moors (ascending to 300 m on Dartmoor, Devon).
Flight period
Univoltine; early March to mid-May.
Nesting biology
A cleptoparasite of Andrena apicata (Perkins, 1919, 1943, 1945; Chambers, 1949) and A. clarkella (Perkins, 1919). Often observed in the vicinity of the nest burrows of these two species of mining bees, especially A. clarkella.
Flowers visited
Barren strawberry, bilberry, dandelion and sallow.

Nomada lathburiana (Lode)

Discription
Length 8mm. One of the black and yellow banded Nomada species, N. lathburiana also has red markings on the body.
Habitat
Around the nesting sites of its host Andrena cineraria.
When to see it
Seen from April to June.
Life History
UK Status
Nomada lathburiana was a Red Data Book species but seems to be fairly frequent, and increasing in numbers along with its host Andrena cineraria, suggesting that its status may be secure.

Nomada panzeri (Roman road)

There is a group of Nomada bees that cant be separated by the eye or macro photo, it is the flava  group , these are all the same size , colouring so they can only be separated by hair colour on certain parts , body markings (not the stripes as these are variable)

N. panzeri is recorded over much of Britain but is rarely as common as N. flava in the south and more strongly associated with woodland. It has a number of hosts: A. varians, synadelpha, helvola, fucata, lapponica and fulva, and a number of host races seem to be present (the taxonomic status of these needs investigation). Females associated with A. lapponica are usually very dark, whilst those associated with A. fulva tend to be as large as N. flava.

Nomada ferruginata (specimen) Lode

SONY DSC

Description
This Nomada bee has a red abdomen with yellow flashes at the sides. It has dull yellow legs with dark femora. It lacks stripes on the thorax and has a pair of bright yellow tubercles on the pronotum near to the wing bases.
Similar Species
Nomada ferruginata is similar to N. striata but it can be distinguished by the brighter yellow pronotal tubercles and lighter antennae. N. ferruginata also lacks the red marks on the mesonotum which are usually obvious on N. striata.
Habitat
Low vegetation around dry soils where its host bee nests.
When to see it
Mainly during March and April – to coincide with the breeding of its host bee Andrena praecox.
Life History
As with all Nomada bees, it is parasitic on solitary bees, usualy Andrena species. The host species of N. ferruginata is Andrena praecox. A.praecox is a rather uncommon mining bee and normally found in areas containing sufficient Willows as females are very dependent on Willow catkins for pollen in March and April.
UK Status
Rare in England but may be increasing.