Glaphyra umbellatarum longhorn- Sandy

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Musk Beetle Aromia moschata (Cavenham Heath NR)

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What a great days insect hunting I’ve had so many firsts. Normally I would just put them all in a gallery with their name but some of these deserve their own post

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About: A long, narrow-bodied long-horn beetle, up to 4cm long with very long antennae. Metallic bluey-green in colour all over. Larvae live in the wood of willow trees, and the adults can be found on flowers and tree trunks near to wetlands during the summer.

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How to identify: An unmistakeable insect if seen well.
Where: Widespread but scarce through England, Wales and southern Scotland.

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so excited to find this , it flew off before I could get a face shot

Leptura quadrifasciata four banded longhorn beetle (Cavenham Heath NR)

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Four-banded Longhorn Beetle: band stands
Insects lead two lives, one as a larva and another as an adult. The habitat in which they thrive is always (well, I think this is true) very different and it certainly is in longhorn beetles. They live their larval stage in dead wood eating their way through dead timbers and helping to break them down in to humus and so the beetles are rarely seen in this stage unless you go specifically looking for them. As adults they become pollen feeders and can be found on a variety of flowers, quite often umbellifers, and so are far more visible.

The attractive four-banded longhorn (Leptura quadrifasciata) is quoted as being relatively common but the adult beetle lives for only a short time and so they are seen far less often than their numerical status would suggest they should. It is one of a small number of similar species but it is most likely to be confused with the spotted longhorn. The arrangement of the golden patches on the wing cases (elytra) tell it apart from the similar species. The four-banded longhorn has an affinity to birch trees and will often be found on flowers near birch trees.

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Stictoleptura rubra- type of long horn beetle

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I am chuffed with the bishops flower that I have tried for the first time this year , it has bought many other insects to the garden.

Other Names

Corymbia rubra and as Leptura rubra
Description
Sometimes known as the Red Longhorn Beetle from the colour of the female. Length up to 19 mm. The species is striking to look at the female being uniformly red-brown in colour; males having pale ochre coloured elytraand black head and thorax.

Habitat
Juveniles often found on various pines, firs and larches. Adults visit flowers for nectar and pollen.
When to see it
The adults appear at the height of the summer.
Life History
The larvae develop in old dead wood and tree stumps, mainly in coniferous forests.
UK Status
Uncommon and with a southerly distribution in Britain.