Gorytes laticinctus (Garden) rare

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The rarest of the British species of Gorytes.

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Distribution
Recorded sparingly over southern England (Devon, Dorset, Wiltshire, Hampshire, Kent, Essex, Cambridgeshire, Suffolk and Norfolk). In the Channel Islands, found on Guernsey, Herm and Sark.

Status (in Britain only)
Listed as Rare (RDB3) in Shirt (1987) and by Falk (1991). The wasp may have declined, but it appears to have habits that render it somewhat elusive – few records have been submitted to the BWARS recorder.

Habitat
Usually associated with rough vegetation such as brambles in open situations (heathland, scrub, coastal dunes, coastal landslips and soft rock cliffs), quarries and occasionally gardens. Typically observed running over brambles and other low herbage.

Flight period
Mid-June to mid-August.

Nesting biology
Nesting occurs in light soils. P F Yeo observed a female excavating nests in the soft mortar between paving stones in his Cambridgeshire garden. The female made several excavations each day. Hamm & Richards (1930) cite a foreign account of a nest in a flower-pot. The main nest tunnel extends about 10 cm down into the soil (at which point it may continue a small distance upwards), giving rise to 3-4 short side tunnels with terminal cells (Lomholdt, 1975-1976). The cells are stocked with auchenorhynchus bugs such as Philaenus spumarius, Cercopis spp. and Aphrophora alni.

Flowers visited
Umbellifers such as wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), carrot (Daucus carota), hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium) and water-dropworts (Oenanthe sp.).

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Cerceris quinquefasciata (cavenham heath NR)

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I have been getting slack in my photography , I see something and think ive seen loads of them , then a quick couple of pics not worrying about quality (although I’ve had a problem with my camera). Then only when I get back home I realise its a new sighting for me. I did it for a Skipper to the other day and that was a first too.

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Distribution
Although widely distributed in southern England (especially in the south-east), this is a rare species. The majority of records are old, the most recent including individuals collected in Kent, Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk and Oxfordshire. Where found, this wasp may be quite common; for example, O W Richards collected a long series at Studland cliffs towards Old Harry Rocks, Dorset, in July 1939 (specimens in the Natural History Museum, London).

Status (in Britain only)
Listed as Rare (RDB3) in Shirt (1987) and Falk (1991).

Flight period
The species flies from mid-July to late August.

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Prey collected
Small curculionid beetles.

Nesting biology
The biology of this species is much less well known than that of C. arenaria, but is likely to be very similar. Nests are often aggregated and tend to occur in relatively hard sandy soil, such as paths (Hamm & Richards, 1930). Prey is again primarily weevils, but generally smaller species (e.g. Apion, Sitona), so that each cell often contains 50 or more specimens, there being up to ten cells per nest (Grandi in Lomholdt, 1976).

Flowers visited
Bramble and creeping thistle. Authors of profile G R Else and J P Field.

(type of digger wasp) Crossocerus sp

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Sorry there is no real information on this type of wasp also there are many all black wasps in this Crossocerus species  and it would take a dissection by a entomologist to give the exact identification.

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Cerceris arenaria (type of digger wasp)

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(wasp on the flower not in flight the one in flight is a  Ornate tailed wasp )

Very similar in size, structure and markings to Philanthus triangulum and with equally deadly effect, this predatory wasp attacks Weevils. The adult takes it’s prey back to the nest where it will provide food for the developing young. Cerceris arenaria belongs to the Crabronidae group. These are more commonly known as Digger Wasps.

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This has the broad thick black stripes on the abdomen which almost touch each other  and the yellow dot on the side of the head.