Ancistrocerus oviventris – Coton NR

Distribution
Found throughout England, Wales, Scotland (except Orkney and Shetland), Ireland and the Channel Islands.
Overseas, occurs in many parts of Europe (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, The Netherlands, Belgium, France, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Italy, Poland, Austria, Albania, Bulgaria, Georgia), North Africa (Morocco), Asia (Transbaikal, Manchuria, Mongolia, Japan). In central Europe found in mountainous areas up to 2000 m.
Status (in Britain only)
Not listed in Shirt (1987) or Falk (1991); work for this Atlas suggests that the species is possibly declining in central and eastern England.
Habitat
Found in a wide variety of habitats: moorland, lowland heaths, clay and sandy woodlands, parkland, limestone and chalk quarries, calcareous grassland, coastal cliffs, sand dunes and urban areas (gardens and cemeteries).
Flight period
Probably univoltine; mostly May to July, sometimes during August, and rarely in April, September and October.
Prey collected
Microlepidoptera larvae, usually tortricids.
Nesting biology
A mud-dauber building with clay. Its nest consists of several cells (usually 3-5, but up to 14 have been recorded), covered by a layer of protective, camouflaging mud. Nests may be found on walls, stone columns, concrete blocks, and rocks; often using crevices and indentations. Also recorded nesting in a lock (Sheppard, 1926) and in the holes of an oak cribbage board. Initially a row of cells is built on the substrate with additional cells placed on top. Usually four or five prey are placed in each cell. The larval stage lasts about 15 days.

Advertisements

Andrena proxima – Coton NR

Andrena proxima , this ID is not 100% but is the ID given by BWARS as most likely.

Status (in Britain only)
Listed as Rare (RDB3) in Shirt (1987) and by Falk (1991).
Habitat
Open sites, rich in flowering umbellifers (Apiaceae), both inland and on the coast.
Flight period
Univoltine; mid May to late June.
Nesting biology
The species nests either solitarily or in small aggregations, generally avoiding sandy soils (Kocourek 1966;Westrich 1989). Nests do not seem to have been discovered in Britain.
Flowers visited
The bee has been reported to visit the flowers of Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum), cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris), hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna), hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium), rough chervil (Chaerophyllum temulum), a spurge (Euphorbia sp.) and a water-dropwort (Oenanthe sp.).
Parasites
Nests are attacked by the cuckoo bee Nomada conjungens. On mainland Europe, stylopized individuals of A. proxima have been found, but these have not been reported from Britain.

Gymnomerus laevipes Male – Coton NR

ID confirmed By BWARS

One of many similar black and yellow striped wasps. Great care is needed with identification and expert help should be sought.

Habitat
Found in a wide variety of open habitats, associated with its nesting and feeding sites and prey habitats.
When to see it
Recorded from May until September, with males mostly found from late May and June, and females during June and July.
Life History
Preys on weevil larvae of the genera Hypera (Curculionidae). A tube-dweller forming a series of 4 to 12 linearly arranged cells separated by clay partitions in hollow plant stems, e.g. bramble, burdock, elder and thistles. An egg is laid in the cell before about 20 weevil larvae are added.
UK Status
Distributed from Cornwall to Kent and north to Nottinghamshire and East Norfolk, with an isolated record from Westmorland. Lack of records since 1970 indicates that this species has recently undergone a significant decline, especially in the northern part of its range… Naturespot

Blood-vein moth – Timandra comae- Coton NR

Wingspan 23-28 mm. This attractive moth is fairly common in the southern counties of England and Wales, but scarcer further north and in Ireland. The adult rests with the wings held in such a position that the reddish cross-lines of the fore and hind wings form a continuous band. The fringes are also suffused with pink. It has two generations, from May to July and in August and September. The larvae feed on low-growing plants such as dock (Rumex).

Black-horned Cleg – Haematopota crassicornis (Coton NR)

Description
The Haematopota genus is distinctive due to the mottled wings. H. crassicornis has a greyish abdomen and all-black antennae.
Similar Species
H. pluvialis is the other common species in this genus and very similar though tends to have a brown rather than grey appearance. The males of both species have eye-bands that stop halfway up, while females of both species have eye-bands over the whole of the eyes. However males of pluvialis have an orange third antennal segment.
Habitat
Moist habitats, well wooded areas, pond margins and woodland.
When to see it
May to August.
Life History
Males feed from flowers, but the females bite to draw blood from large mammals including humans.
UK Status
Widespread and fairly common in Britain.

Sphecodes sp (blood bees) Coton NR

SONY DSC

I have posted a couple of types of this bee but as always with these an id could only be confirmed with there being 16 types of this bee and many looks the same .. so if you look at all my Sphecodes bees they are different that alone cant give an exact ID.

SONY DSC

Sixteen species are recorded from the British mainland with another species found on the Channel Islands. Sphecodes are cleptoparasites of other bees in the genera Lasioglossum, Halictus and Andrena. For many males, examination of the male genitalia is essential for accurate identification, and this needs to be pulled out when pinning fresh material. There is much scope for improving the understanding of Sphecodes-host relationships in Britain…. Steven FalkĀ 

SONY DSC