Silpha laevigata- Lode

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Byrrhus pilula – Cavenham heath NR

This is an all brown pill beetle with inconspicuous rows of dark and light brown markings on the elytra. The name Pill Beetle stems from the ability to retract all appendages into grooves underneath the body, feigning death in this manner and resembling a rabbit dropping
Habitat
They live among grasses and mosses and are very slow moving.
When to see it
All year round.
Life History
Believed to feed on mosses, as larvae and adults.
UK Status
Widespread in Britain, but probably overlooked at times.

Megatoma undata – Cavenham Heath

4 to 6 mm. Black with distinctive white markings on the pronotum and elytra. Freshly emerged specimens are initially brown.
Habitat
The typical habitat of the adults is around dead wood although they may also be found on flowers e.g. Crataegus or Malus in the spring and early summer when they may be pollen feeders.
When to see it
April and May
UK Status
In Britain this species is mainly found south of the Humber.

Megatoma undata

Megatoma undata

Platyrhinus resinosus -Scarce Fungus Weevil- Lode

you can’t imagine the amount of bird poops I’ve looked at thinking it was one of these beetles , which proves its bird poop camouflage works

Description
This is truly an odd looking creature and could hardly be confused with anything else. The mix of dark and light areas on the elytra may vary, but the general appearance does not – the ‘face’ is always lighter due to a covering of pale hairs. Also known as the Cramp-ball Fungus Weevil.
Habitat
Woodland.
When to see it
June and July are peak times for the adult.
Life History
The larvae develop inside the black fungus known as King Alfred’s Cakes or Cramp Balls (Daldinia concentrica).
UK Status
It is not quite as scarce as its common name would suggest. British records come mainly from England around a line from the Humber to the Severn.