Moth Trapping II

I tried the Moth trap last night it was a clear calm night, surprisingly I got less moths in than the wet and windy night but it is nearly a full moon and no moth trap lamp will compete with that . These are the new moths found in the trap large Old lady Moth and an Orange Swift.

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River Cam Walk

White masked bee (garden)

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I found this dead white masked bee which as you know are tiny , it was great to get the chance to look at it in detail with my little magnifying glass … the photos don’t do it justice as I had to try and take the photo through the glass.

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Lode Mill Walk

Today I went a walk along the Lode at Lode mill , usually its a great place for insects and dragonflies etc .. but I was very disappointed. I think its just been one of those poor summers.

Cherry Hinton Chalk pits walk

After my hospital visit for my Hand, I popped in to the old chalk pit near the hospital, a few insects but it was a windy cloudy day .. more info Cherry Hinton Chalk Pits

Greater Wax Moth, Galleria mellonella (garden)

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I found this moth in the Studio Its not what I want to see in my garden, but as long as my hives are strong they should cope with wax moth.

The males of this species have a distinctively concave outer edge to the forewing; the females are generally plainer in appearance with a less concave edge.

The name ‘Wax Moth’ refers to the moth’s lifestyle – it lives in beehives, where the larvae feed on the honeycomb.

Flying between June and October, the adults can be attracted to light…. Uk Moths

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Premphredon sp of wasp (garden)

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Confirmed Premphredon sp of wasp

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Pemphredon species are closely related to the Ammophila species. However they are much smaller, some measuring no more than 0.2 centimeters. Their body is also much shorter, for they lack the prolonged waist common in the Sand Digger Wasps. Their larvae feed on cicadas, plant lice or even thrips, which mother hides in existing openings in wood, twigs or reet, rather than digging one in the ground. There are some 800 species world wide.