Cola nut gall-Andricus lignicola (Kinver Edge NT)

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Description
The gall wasp Andricus lignicola lays eggs into the leaf axil buds and terminal buds of English Oak and Sessile Oak causing scaly, marble like galls to form. These are often referred to as Cola-nut Galls. The galls are seen more often than the adult wasps. The galls are found in small groups, which however do not coalesce, helping to prevent misidentification with the Oak Marble Gall (Andricus kollari), in addition the shape is ovoid rather than spherical. Scaly, grey at first, later brown; very hard; old galls persist for years; often in clusters of two to five; single chamber off-centre; exit hole always close to point of attachment.d it is scaly rather than smooth.
Habitat
Wherever the host species occur.
When to see it
Galls are most likely to be found in early autumn, but may persist for years… Naturespot

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Thistle Gall (Cavenham Heath NR)

The Gall is Caused by the Thistle Gall Fly – Urophora cardui  which
lays its eggs on Creeping Thistle (Cirsium arvense). After hatching, the larvae burrow into the stem of the plant and form a gall (or swelling).

Thistle gall caused by a gall wasp

Thistle gall caused by a gall wasp

Ormyrus nitidulus (Cavenham Heath NR)

Really pleased with this find today its only a few mm long.

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A female Ormyrus nitidulus on a knopper gall (a type of gall that develops when a developing acorn of the pedunculate oak Quercus robur is parasitised by the cynipid wasp Andricus quercuscalicis)

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Gall wasps, also called gallflies, are a family (Cynipidae) of the order Hymenoptera and are classified with the Apocrita suborder of wasps in the superfamily Cynipoidea. Their common name comes from the galls they induce on plants for larval development.