Meadow Grasshopper – Chorthippus parallelus (Coton NR)

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Description
Length 10-23 mm. Green-coloured but often with brown wings and sometimes entirely brown coloured. Pronotal side-keels only very slightly incurved. Some adult females are a vivid pinkish purple. Males are long-winged, while females are usually short-winged.
Habitat
It is found amongst long grass, which it eats.
When to see it
Long season with nymphs hatching in April. Adults appear by June and remain abundant through to September, some may survive into November.
Life History
The eggs are laid just below the soil and hatch the next spring.
UK Status
Common and widespread in Britain…. Naturespot

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Mottled Grasshopper – Myrmeloetettix maculatus (cavenham Heath NR)

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Description
Length 12-19 mm. This is a small grasshopper with many colour variations. Clubbed antennae of males and thickened antennal tips of females are distinctive, both lack white tips. The side keels of the pronotum are deeply indented.
Habitat
It lives in dry, sunny places where the grass is short and there is bare ground or rocks. Railway sidings, old quarries, heathland and coastal areas are the main habitats where it is found.
When to see it
Nymphs hatch from end of April to June. Adults appear by mid June through to October.
Life History
Herbivorous, mainly grasses.
UK Status
It is widely distributed but not common in the UK

Naturespot..

Roesels Bush Cricket, Metrioptera roeselii (Cavenham heath NR)

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About

Until the early 20th century, Roesel’s Bush-cricket was only found on the south-east coast. Recent years have seen a rapid expansion in its range, particularly helped by roadside rough grassland and scrub providing a ‘corridor’ for it to travel along. It favours damp meadows and grassland, but can be found elsewhere.

How to identify

Roesel’s Bush-cricket is dark brown with orangey legs, a green face, a creamy border to the thorax, and two or three bright cream spots on its sides. It is best recognised by its song, which is a long, monotonous, mechanical noise.

Dark Bush cricket Pholidoptera griseoaptera (Cavenham Heath NR)

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About

A common animal across the southern half of England, the noisy, irregular chirpings of the dark bush-cricket are a familiar feature of late summer. An animal of gardens, hedgerows and woodland edges, dark bush-crickets can often be seen in quite large numbers sunbathing on bramble patches. However, males are very aggressive, defending their territories against intruders. Females lay their eggs in late summer in rotting wood or bark crevices; they emerge 18 months later, so odd-year and even-year dark bush-crickets never meet.

How to identify

The dark bush-cricket lives up to its name: it’s dark to red-brown, with a paler patch along the top of the thorax, and a yellow-green belly. The female has an up-curved ovipositor.

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